Is Indoor Air Worsening Your Asthma?

Asthma is a serious, sometimes life-threatening chronic respiratory disease that affects the quality of life for almost 25 million Americans, including an estimated seven-million children. Although there is no cure for asthma yet, the condition can be controlled through medical treatment and careful management of environmental triggers, including household allergens and irritants.

According to the EPA, Americans, on average, spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors where the concentrations of some pollutants are often 2 to 5 times higher than typical outdoor concentrations. Indoor allergens and irritants (like mold, dust mites, or smoke) can play a significant role in triggering asthma attacks. If you have asthma, you may react to just one trigger or to several. Once you have worked with your doctor or other medical professional to identify your triggers, the next step is to reduce your risk of exposure in your own home. Here are some of the most significant categories of indoor asthma triggers, and tactics for avoiding them:

 

Secondhand Tobacco Smoke

Smoke from Fireplaces

Mold

Dust, Dander, and Mites

Pets

Pollen

Household Chemicals and Fragrances

Pests

 

Asthma is a serious condition, and management of your home’s indoor air quality may help you in managing it.

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